Restorative

Drs. Elrod, Green & Heimer provide comprehensive restorative dentistry options to fix common oral health problems and restore your natural teeth.

If you’ve been told you need a dental filling, you’re not alone—92% of Americans have had at least one cavity. Dental fillings are the tried-and-true treatment for treating cavities and they come in a variety of options to suit every need. Dental fillings can be made of silver amalgam, composite, porcelain and even gold. Amalgam fillings have been used by dentists for more than a century and are still the most common and cost-effective type of dental filling. But composite fillings, which are made of a tooth-colored plastic and glass composite, are quickly becoming the preferred dental filling due to their natural appearance and durability. The type of dental filling used is determined by a number of factors, including size and location of the cavity, as well as your budget.

Dental bridges have been used for centuries to replace missing teeth. Today, dental bridges are still considered one of the most durable, conservative and cost-effective options for bridging the gap between a missing tooth and surrounding teeth. Comprised of two anchoring teeth and a replacement tooth, dental bridges help prevent surrounding teeth from drifting out of position, improve chewing and speaking and help keep your natural face shape in tact. Dental bridges typically take 2-3 weeks to complete and are less invasive than other options such as dental implants. With good oral hygiene and regular dental visits, dental bridges can last up to 30 years.

There are three types of dental bridges:

Traditional Bridges have either dental crowns or dental implants on either side of the missing tooth, plus a replacement tooth, which is held in place by a post-like structure called a dental abutment.

Cantilever Dental Bridges are used in cases where there are surrounding teeth only on one side of the missing tooth.

Maryland Bridges are made of a specialized resin that is cemented to a metal framework and cemented to the enamel of surrounding teeth.

CEREC® crowns are made right in our office during a single visit out of a solid block of ceramic or resin materials. It is considerably stronger than many other types of crowns. There is no metal there is no ugly gray line at your gum line. With a CEREC® crown there is no temporary crown, no extra impressions for a permanent crown, no waiting for a permanent crown—all it takes is one day.

Using dentures to replace missing teeth is not only great for your oral health but it’s a great way to look and feel younger! Today, there are a variety of natural-looking and comfortable dentures for patients who need to replace missing teeth. Made of a gum-colored plastic resin or acrylic base and either resin or porcelain replacement teeth, dentures are custom designed to fit your mouth. If you have several teeth or all teeth missing on the upper or lower jaw, full dentures may be your best option. Partial dentures, which can be either fixed or removable, are great for patients who have several missing teeth scattered along the upper or lower jaw.

The process of getting dentures may take a few months and several dental visits. In some cases, however, same-day dentures are also possible. With same-day dentures, the dentures are created right in the dentist’s office instead of at an offsite laboratory. Same-day dentures aren’t for everyone, though. If your dentures require a lot of customization, same-day dentures may not be right for you.

Just as with your natural teeth, dentures require daily maintenance. With regular wear and tear, your dentures can last five to seven years. During that time, you may need periodic denture relines to accommodate changes in the contours of your mouth. Regular denture relines involve resurfacing the base to ensure that your dentures fit and function perfectly. If you break your dentures, it’s critical to bring them to your dentist for professional denture repair. Home denture repair kits can cause more damage and be even more costly to fix.

Root canals get a bad wrap. But don’t believe the rumors—the dreaded root canal isn’t dreadful at all. Root canals are needed when either decay or an injury infects the inner tooth (the pulp). In the earliest stages of infection, you may not feel any pain at all. But when it progresses, you could have a toothache and swelling or a dental abscess might form. Root canals remove the infection and prevent it from spreading. Thanks to laser root canals, this process is faster, more comfortable and in many cases, more thorough than conventional root canals. Pulp capping is an alternative to root canals that are used when the infection has yet to penetrate the pulp. Pulp capping can also prevent a large dental filling from getting too close to the nerve.

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Call us at (877) 974-7249